PACHworks / Trainings & Events

PACH Events

We conduct trainings, workshops, and public events to communicate the science of human connection. Contact us for more information.

The Science of Human Connection Summer Institute

PACH is offering a four-day summer institute in the month of June 2021 to teach the content of the Science of Human Connection course to faculty who are interested in teaching it or a version of it at their home campuses. The institute will take place in upstate New York at the beautiful Carey Institute for Global Good. At the summer institute, faculty attendees will learn about the science of human connection by listening to and engaging with leading researchers and practitioners whose work are a part of the five-part story. Faculty attendees will also learn about ways to integrate the course into their existing courses. If you are interested in attending next year, you can find the application here.

Trainings

PACH has conducted trainings in schools and organizations around the country. Most recently, the PACH team trained NYU advisors and peer mentors who lead the New Student Seminar on how to facilitate challenging conversations across differences. The New Student Seminar is a semester-long required course for all 900+ new students who join NYU Steinhardt each year. Our trainings and workshops are focused on challenging stereotypes, decreasing bias, increasing empathy and fostering a sense of common humanity.

Public Events

Over the past four years, PACH has organized public events and series focused on different aspects of the science of human connection. In 2016, a Love Rally was held in Washington Square Park. PACH currently partners with the Diversity Council at NYU Steinhardt to offer the Faculty and Community Engagement (FACES) series, a forum for faculty and community members to wrestle with issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion and to strengthen personal, and professional connections and growth.

Click here for videos of our various forums.

The practice stemming from the science of human connection has profound implications for how we listen and work with students.

NYU Advisor