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May19

What's So Scary About Smart Girls?

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The New York Times

What's So Scary About Smart Girls?

When terrorists in Nigeria organized a secret attack last month, they didn't target an army barracks, a police department or a drone base. No, Boko Haram militants attacked what is even scarier to a fanatic: a girls' school.

That's what extremists do. They target educated girls, their worst nightmare.

That's why the Pakistani Taliban shot Malala Yousafzai in the head at age 15. That's why the Afghan Taliban throws acid on the faces of girls who dare to seek an education.

Why are fanatics so terrified of girls' education? Because there's no force more powerful to transform a society. The greatest threat to extremism isn't drones firing missiles, but girls reading books.

Apr28

Masculine boys, feminine girls more likely to engage in cancer risk behaviors

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Harvard School of Public Health

Masculine boys, feminine girls more likely to engage in cancer risk behaviors

Young people who conform most strongly to norms of masculinity and femininity—the most "feminine" girls and the most "masculine" boys—are significantly more likely than their peers to engage in behaviors that pose cancer risks, according to a new study led by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers.

Apr15

Raising a Moral Child

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New York Times

Raising a Moral Child

What does it take to be a good parent? We know some of the tricks for teaching kids to become high achievers. For example, research suggests that when parents praise effort rather than ability, children develop a stronger work ethic and become more motivated.

Yet although some parents live vicariously through their children's accomplishments, success is not the No. 1 priority for most parents. We're much more concerned about our children becoming kind, compassionate and helpful.

Apr12

The Self-Sort

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NYTimes

The Self-Sort

We need to see people other than ourselves in order to empathize. If we don't live around others we do ourselves and our society damage because our ability to relate becomes impaired.

It's easy to demonize, or simply dismiss, people you don't know or see.

Apr07

Neither Female nor Male

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Neither Female nor Male

A recent court ruling in Australia has the potential to not only challenge but upend our conceptualizations of the gender binary. Author Julia Baird discusses the implications of the ruling, as well as the story of the chief plaintiff, Norrie May-Welby. What happens when we are confronted with the idea that an individual can be "both a man and a woman...not simply one and not the other," as May-Welby says?

Apr02

We <3 McGill University for Reclaiming the "F-Word"

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Ms. Magazine Blog

We <3 McGill University for Reclaiming the "F-Word"

The campaign collected photographs of McGill staff, faculty and students of all different religions, races, ethnicities and genders, all declaring themselves as feminists. McGill is reclaiming the word from those who, over the years, have changed "feminism" to the "f-word", reprimanding women (and men) as if they've cursed.

Mar25

Killing Us Softly 4

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YouTube

Killing Us Softly 4

In this new update of her pioneering Killing Us Softly series, the first in more than a decade, Jean Kilbourne takes a fresh look at how advertising traffics in distorted and destructive ideals of femininity. The film marshals a range of new print and television advertisements to lay bare a stunning pattern of damaging gender stereotypes -- images and messages that too often reinforce unrealistic, and unhealthy, perceptions of beauty, perfection, and sexuality.

Mar25

Is the World More Depressed?

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NYTImes

Is the World More Depressed?

We know that social position affects both when you die and how sick you get: The higher your social position, the healthier you are. It turns out that your sense of relative social rank — where you draw a line on an abstract ladder to show where you are with respect to others — predicts many health outcomes, including depression, sometimes even more powerfully than your objective socioeconomic status.

Mar25

A Common Core for All of Us

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NYTImes

A Common Core for All of Us

Maybe what we need is a common core for families, in which mothers and fathers, sons and daughters, all read the same book, and sit down at the table to talk about it. Having a language in common doesn't mean we have to agree with one another. It simply means that we — as a family, a college or a country — can engage in a meaningful conversation about the life of the mind.

Mar25

How Strong Social Connections Can Help People With Depression

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HuffPost Healthy Living

How Strong Social Connections Can Help People With Depression

"We were able to find clear evidence that joining groups, and coming to identify with them, can alleviate depression," study researcher Alexander Haslam, who is a senior fellow affiliated with the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, said in a statement.

Mar19

Why I Retired At 26

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The Huffington Post

Why I Retired At 26

Addressing his recent retirement from the National Football League at the age of 26, presumably just as he was entering his prime, Mendenhall answers the question of "why?" Mendenhall calls out the limitations imposed upon him and other professional athletes as well as the changing nature of the game itself as it becomes more of a business and less of a sport.

Mar19

Can We All "Have It All"?

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Ted.com

Can We All "Have It All"?

Public policy expert Anne-Marie Slaughter made waves with her 2012 article, "Why women still can't have it all." But really, is this only a question for women? In a Ted Conference, Slaughter expands her ideas and explains why shifts in work culture, public policy and social mores can lead to more equality — for men, women, all of us.

Mar19

The Grunts: Damned If They Kill, Damned If They Don't

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The Huffington Post

The Grunts: Damned If They Kill, Damned If They Don't

In the first of a three-part series, David Wood details the tolls that are taken on soldiers who are forced to kill or be killed in combat. In a mixture of interview vignettes from veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan and larger-picture views, Wood discusses the concept of moral injury and role that plays in the unspoken mental health tolls of America's foreign military actions.

Mar19

How to Succeed Professionally by Helping Others

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The Atlantic

How to Succeed Professionally by Helping Others

In professional settings, it's all too easy to take generosity for granted, especially when it comes from women. In a series of studies, NYU psychologists Madeline Heilman and Julie Chen found that volunteering to help colleagues boosted performance evaluations and rewards for men, but not women. Dr. Grant discusses this disparity as well as the benefits of engaging groups to help one another in the workplace in this piece in the Atlantic.

Mar13

Bossy Pants?

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The New York Times

Bossy Pants?

Charles M. Blow, Op-Ed columnist for the New York Times, discusses the importance of allowing space for girls and boys, women and men, to be able to express the full range of their selves. In his words, "Our current turn toward tolerance for sexual identities and gender expressions isn't about more people being less of a man or woman, but about more people feeling safe to be more wholly human. And it's about freedom — freedom of expression, freedom of self-determination and freedom of fluidity."

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